A PowerPoint presentation circulating online — outlining a plan to overturn the 2020 election — is similar to the one Mark Meadows gave to the Jan. 6 panel, report says

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White House chief of staff Mark Meadows speaks on a phone on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, on Oct. 30, 2020

White House chief of staff Mark Meadows speaks on a phone on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, on Oct. 30, 2020AP Photo/Patrick Semansky

  • A 36-page PowerPoint presentation on how to overturn the 2020 election was being shared on Twitter Thursday.

  • The New York Times confirmed Friday it’s similar to the one Mark Meadows gave the January 6 committee.

  • A lawyer for Meadows said he was emailed the document on January 5 and did nothing with it.

A PowerPoint circulating online this week — that detailed extreme plans to overturn the 2020 election — is similar to the one former White House chief of staff Mark Meadows handed over to the House select committee investigating the January 6 Capitol attack, The New York Times confirmed Friday.

Meadows, who served in former President Donald Trump’s White House, previously sent documents to the committee before announcing earlier this week that he was no longer cooperating with the investigation, putting himself at risk of being held in contempt of Congress.

Parts of a 36-page version of the document, titled “Election Fraud, Foreign Interference & Options for 6 JAN,” were shared on Twitter Thursday. The PowerPoint included many of the false claims about voter fraud and election irregularities that were being shared by former President Donald Trump and his allies after Joe Biden’s victory.

The presentation also featured recommendations on how to change the election outcome, including declaring a national security emergency, throwing out all electronic voting, and having Vice President Mike Pence personally select Republican electors.

The New York Times confirmed on Friday the presentation being shared online was similar to the presentation Meadows gave to the January 6 committee. However, the version Meadows provided was 38 pages, and it’s unclear how exactly the two differed.

Phil Waldron, a retired Army colonel who was said to be the one circulating the presentation, did not respond when Insider reached out on Thursday.

On Friday, he told The Times that he sent the presentation to Trump allies before the January 6 insurrection and that one of his associates may have sent it to Meadows. It was not clear who created the document.

A lawyer for Meadows, George J. Terwilliger III, did not immediately respond to Insider’s request for comment. He told The Times that the former chief of staff was emailed the presentation on January 5 and did not do anything with it, adding that they gave it to the January 6 committee simply because it wasn’t privileged.

Despite making the rounds on Twitter this week, the document (or apparent versions of the presentation) have been shared publicly online before, including by Fox News’s Lara Logan on January 5 and other proponents of challenges to the 2020 election.

Have a news tip? Contact this reporter at [email protected].

Read the original article on Business Insider



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