Kentucky family’s old photo sucked into sky by tornadoes, found 150 miles away

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A Kentucky family’s old photo apparently traveled more than 150 miles and landed outside an Indiana woman’s home after it was sucked up into the sky by one of the devastating tornadoes that struck Friday night into Saturday.

Katie Posten, of New Albany, Indiana, walked out to her car on Saturday morning and discovered the worn black and white photograph stuck to the window, she wrote on Facebook

The small image showed a woman in a striped dress holding a young child in her lap with the note “Gertie Swatzell and JD Swatzell, 1942” scribbled on the back.

Posten shared the photograph “in hopes of finding its owners,” assuming that it may have been ripped from one of the homes caught in the destructive, 200-mile long path of the storm system.

In an updated post later on Saturday, Posten said she had tracked the photo’s origin to the Swatzell family from Dawson Springs, Kentucky, a town of about 2,600 people located 150 miles southwest of New Albany, that was ravaged by a tornado.

A woman found an old family photo sticking to her window after it was sucked up into the sky by one of the tornadoes that struck Friday night into Saturday.
A woman found an old family photo sticking to her window after it was sucked up into the sky by one of the tornadoes that struck Friday night into Saturday.
Facebook

“The photo belongs to the Swatzell family in Dawson Springs, KY, which was hit by the tornado last night. I’ve been in touch with a family member and we are making a plan to get the photo back to them,” Posten wrote.

Kentucky Gov. Andy Beshear on Saturday teared up as he surveyed the damage in Dawson Springs, the town where his grandparents are buried, according to The Courier Journal.

Beshear said “it hurts” seeing a large part of town he has family ties to completely destroyed.

After surveying the damages in Dawson Springs and nearby Mayfield, the governor declared the storm was the “deadliest tornado event in the history of Kentucky.”

The storm was considered to be the deadliest tornado event in the history of Kentucky, claimed the mayor.
The storm was considered to be the deadliest tornado event in the history of Kentucky, claimed the mayor.
REUTERS

“Even war zones don’t look this bad. We saw four separate tornadoes hit Kentucky, with the main one staying on the ground for 227 miles,” Beshear said.

The destructive tornadoes claimed the lives of at least 70 people in Kentucky alone and wreaked havoc across five states. Beshear said that number could climb to over 100 as responders continue to search through the rubble for victims.

The tornadoes killed at least 70 people in Kentucky alone and ravaged across five states, as the number could climb to over 100 as responders continue to search for victims.
The tornadoes killed at least 70 people in Kentucky alone and ravaged across five states, as the number could climb to over 100 as responders continue to search for victims.
Getty Images

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